Envt Default's Results

Stuck

Stuck cats usually get stuck close to home in areas that are part of their daily routine.

Summary

  • There’s a strong possibility that Envt Default is stuck or locked in somewhere.
  • You have to find and rescue your kitten.
  • Kittens usually get stuck close to home.
  • Kittens are adventurous but inexperienced. Kittens get stuck often.
  • Stuck kittens meow for help, so LISTEN while you search.

Behavioral Profile

Sociability 60%
Skittishness 56%
Territoriality 42%
Cautiousness 46%
Curiousity 47%
Environment 42%
Personality 47%
Trust 64%

What do these mean? Click any trait above to learn more about it.

Where to Look

  • Within your cat’s territory and immediately adjacent to it 
  • Start with a 2/3 acre radius

Actions to Take

  • Check your yard and wherever your cat usually visits.
  • Stand in front of anywhere your cat might have been stuck and call your cat. 
  • Listen for any meowing or movement.
  • Ask neighbors to leave their garage and outbuilding doors ajar.
  • Look up:  check trees and roofs.
  • Check in with other animals!  Be aware of where they take you.  They can hear things you can’t.

When You'll Get Your Cat Back

  • Most likely between 1-5 days
  • You have a little longer if your cat has a water source

Things to Remember

  • When escaping danger, kittens often climb the nearest tree and then get stuck there.  They can also wind up on rooftops. 
  • Sometimes kittens will explore pipes and storm drains.  
  • If you or a neighbor is moving or having remodeling done, your kitten might have been shut in at the jobsite by mistake.
  • Heavily populated and/or urban areas have more places where a kitten can get locked in or stuck.  
  • Ask the animals! 
    • Animals have better hearing than we do, and they can hear calls for help when humans can’t.  
    • Talk to them and ask them if they’ve seen or heard your cat.  
    • Follow them. They might lead you to the right place.

Helpful Tips & Information

Life of the Party?

Some social cats pose as loveable strays who need rescuing! Some cats go inside other people’s homes and stop for a meal. Gullible neighbors fall for these lies and try to help.

Meeting with Strangers?

Exercise caution and discretion. Ask for photos to confirm your cat’s identity. Do not go alone to meet strangers. Try not to get angry, accuse, assign blame, or directly confront anyone. Be safe and get your cat home safely. 

No Collar?

No collar or tag means that people don’t know how to reach out. Strike up a conversation with as many people as you can. Help your neighbors help you! 

City Dwellers?

Have lots of neighbors? Your cat’s social circle might be bigger than you think! Your job is to launch a publicity campaign that will reach all these people.

Don't Be Rude!

You miss your cat! You want to yell and scream and bang on every door. But right now you need your neighbors’ help! Being persistent but sweet will get you a lot further than accusing people. 

You Know Your Cat!

You know what your cat likes and where they go. Or if you don’t, your neighbors do! Find out who recognizes your cat. That’ll help you narrow down where to look.

Trust

Trust is a measurement of how likely it is that your cat will trust a new person, animal, or situation. A highly trusting cat has been handled by humans early on during his/her development. If your cat is trusting, it’s probable that s/he will approach a human to ask for help.

Personal/Health Risk

Some cats go off to hide when they feel sick or vulnerable. This makes sense when you’re a cat: hiding from all possible predators when you feel lousy ensures that you won’t become prey. Geriatric cats are more vulnerable to health risks.

Environmental Risk

Some environments are more dangerous than others for your cat. Outdoor cats are at risk for injuries, accidents, and animal attacks. There might be a busy road or active predators nearby. Very young cats, older cats, and unaltered cats are particularly vulnerable.

Curiosity

High curiosity is usually a sign of intelligence. Is your cat always up to something? Does your cat love adventure and exploring? Curious cats are born adventurers. They open doors, explore cabinets, and inspect everything that comes into the home. A highly curious cat tends to get into more than his/her share of trouble.

Cautiousness

Cautious cats are wary of problems, dangers, and risks. A cautious cat considers alternatives before making mistakes, especially in an unfamiliar situation or environment. Cats thrust into new territories (displaced cats) almost always become more cautious. Cats are experts at survival, and their instincts make them wary in unknown surrounds, particularly when they’re alone.

Territoriality

All cats are territorial to some extent. A territory includes the area where your cat lives and the family the cat loves. Highly territorial cats are often prone to anxiety about their territories and the thought, real or imagined, that the territory is under attack from an invading force. Territorial cats usually carry the weight of the world on their shoulders.

Skittishness

Skittishness is a measurement of a cat’s startle reflex and the reactions that follow. Skittishness is indicative of unease in unfamiliar situations. Almost all cats have some level of concern about new people and environments. Cats with homeless or feral backgrounds are often skittish. Foundation hybrids also have high levels of skittishness.

Sociability

Sociability is a measurement of how much your cat prefers the company of humans and other animals. Behavior varies from situation to situation, but social cats are interested in what’s going on, and they usually choose to be with others. You will find your social cat is either at the center of the action or at least in the room and part of the conversation. It’s possible for a cat to be social without being a cuddler.

Sex

Spayed and neutered cats usually don’t go very far. Unaltered cats travel farther and are more at risk for injuries, accidents, and territorial disputes. Unneutered males are the most likely cats to be injured or forced to leave after a battle defending valuable resources of food, water, shelter, and access to healthy mates. Unspayed females can disappear to find a mate or have kittens.

Age

Your cat’s age affects how s/he behaves. Kittens are likely to be rescued by humans. Young adult cats (especially males) tend to act impetuously, which can result in unexpected difficulties. Older cats tend not move as quickly or hear as well, and this puts them at risk of accidents, injuries, and animal attacks.

Breed

Breed can influence behavior. Some breeds are bred to be more confident around humans. Hybrid breeds are usually more skittish in new situations, especially foundation cats (F1-F3 generations). They usually cover wider areas than domestic housecats.

Age

Your cat’s age affects how s/he behaves. Kittens are likely to be rescued by humans. Young adult cats (especially males) tend to act impetuously, which can result in unexpected difficulties. Older cats tend not move as quickly or hear as well, and this puts them at risk of accidents, injuries, and animal attacks.

Breed

Breed can influence behavior. Some breeds are bred to be more confident around humans. Hybrid breeds are usually more skittish in new situations, especially foundation cats (F1-F3 generations). They usually cover wider areas than domestic housecats.

Sex

Spayed and neutered cats usually don’t go very far. Unaltered cats travel farther and are more at risk for injuries, accidents, and territorial disputes. Unneutered males are the most likely cats to be injured or forced to leave after a battle defending valuable resources of food, water, shelter, and access to healthy mates. Unspayed females can disappear to find a mate or have kittens.

Sociability

Sociability is a measurement of how much your cat prefers the company of humans and other animals. Behavior varies from situation to situation, but social cats are interested in what’s going on, and they usually choose to be with others. You will find your social cat is either at the center of the action or at least in the room and part of the conversation. It’s possible for a cat to be social without being a cuddler.

Skittishness

Skittishness is a measurement of a cat’s startle reflex and the reactions that follow. Skittishness is indicative of unease in unfamiliar situations. Almost all cats have some level of concern about new people and environments. Cats with homeless or feral backgrounds are often skittish. Foundation hybrids also have high levels of skittishness.

Territoriality

All cats are territorial to some extent. A territory includes the area where your cat lives and the family the cat loves. Highly territorial cats are often prone to anxiety about their territories and the thought, real or imagined, that the territory is under attack from an invading force. Territorial cats usually carry the weight of the world on their shoulders.

Trust

Trust is a measurement of how likely it is that your cat will trust a new person, animal, or situation. A highly trusting cat has been handled by humans early on during his/her development. If your cat is trusting, it’s probable that s/he will approach a human to ask for help.

Curiosity

High curiosity is usually a sign of intelligence. Is your cat always up to something? Does your cat love adventure and exploring? Curious cats are born adventurers. They open doors, explore cabinets, and inspect everything that comes into the home. A highly curious cat tends to get into more than his/her share of trouble.

Environmental Risk

Some environments are more dangerous than others for your cat. Outdoor cats are at risk for injuries, accidents, and animal attacks. There might be a busy road or active predators nearby. Very young cats, older cats, and unaltered cats are particularly vulnerable.

Personal/Health Risk

Some cats go off to hide when they feel sick or vulnerable. This makes sense when you’re a cat: hiding from all possible predators when you feel lousy ensures that you won’t become prey. Geriatric cats are more vulnerable to health risks.

Cautiousness

Cautious cats are wary of problems, dangers, and risks. A cautious cat considers alternatives before making mistakes, especially in an unfamiliar situation or environment. Cats thrust into new territories (displaced cats) almost always become more cautious. Cats are experts at survival, and their instincts make them wary in unknown surrounds, particularly when they’re alone.

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